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Posts Tagged ‘kids’

Take a Hike

June 17th, 2012 No comments

Hiking with kidsAs a dad, I am always interested in finding activities that my kids enjoy and that I enjoy doing with them. One of the best activities I’ve found is hiking. Kids are natural climbers, and interested in exploring the outdoors, so it’s never a hard sell to convince them to go for a hike. But there are some things that can make it a pretty miserable experience. Here are the ways that we have found to keep hiking a fun, family activity.

Length is important. A hike that takes too long will quickly become a test of patience as the kids complain about how far they have to go or how much their feet hurt. Miles aren’t as important as time, if the terrain is challenging even a one mile walk may be too much. We recently completed a hike that was a 2 mile round trip, but with 1000 feet of elevation. With all the breaks, it took almost 45 minutes to get to the top, then we had to get back down again. Being flexible with your schedule is important as well. It’s hard to gauge how quickly children will hike, so if a hike is taking too long don’t be afraid to adjust your plans. A good way to ensure that a hike is not too long is to be heading back to the start well before you are feeling tired.

Route is important as well. Loop trails are great for grown-ups as the sights are different for the whole trip, but for kids they can be problematic. Having to finish a full loop can make a hike too long if you are not prepared for the distance, and it can seem never-ending for kids who don’t have an idea of how close they are to the finish. An out and back hike can be turned around at any time, and the kids see familiar landmarks on the return trip that give them hope for the finish.

The goal of a hike doesn’t have to be a destination, but it should always include snacks. Bring granola bars, or trail mix and eat them at the half-way point. If kids are older you can plan a day hike and eat lunch. Always bring more food and water than you think you need, even if you don’t eat it all it’s better to have a reserve than to run out. Trail mix is great for keeping kids moving when they are tired. They can be snacking on raisins and peanuts right out of their hand as they walk. As well as keeping their energy reserves up, it’s a distraction from sore feet.

Bring extra clothes. Jackets and hats weigh very little for a grown-up, but can be a huge source of comfort if the weather changes. Make sure you bring clothes for yourself as well, young kids walk slowly enough that you may not be generating as much heat as you would on a hike on your own. Raincoats or ponchos are cheap and pack down incredibly small, there’s no excuse for not having one at the bottom of your pack.

In Colorado we are fortunate to have trails in the foothills and mountains that offer incredible opportunities for hiking with kids, but mountains are not necessary for a great hike. Kids are interested in everything around them, and wildlife and insects can be found even on urban trails and parks. Take your time to examine things with them and you will find things to talk about both on the trail and long after the hike is over. It’s an adventure that everyone in the family will appreciate!

Categories: fitness, parenting Tags: , ,

DIY Hurdles for Kids

June 1st, 2012 No comments

HurdlesOur youngest son is finishing preschool this year, and the class was participating in a field day event. There was very little support from the school for the event, however, so the parents ended up doing most of the organizing. We are fortunate in that there are at least two or three parents involved with the preschool that understand how fun a field day can be for young kids.

Melissa asked the school for access to some of the small hurdles that were being used for the older kids, but was told that preschoolers are too small to jump hurdles and they might get injured. Not one to let adversity get her down, she decided we could make some hurdles ourselves. I thought that would be a great project, and I advised her to get 3/4″ PVC pipe and some tees and elbows for the project. She ended up getting the following items:

  • 3 x 10-foot lengths of 3/4″ PVC pipe
  • 8 x 3/4″ PVC Tees
  • 8 x 3/4″ PVC 90° Elbows
  • PVC Primer
  • PVC Cement
  • Tubing cutter for PVC pipe less than 1 5/8″ diameter

Using these supplies I was charged with making 4 hurdles of reasonable size for preschool children. I first laid out the three pipes and measured for the feet and the cross-bar. I wanted the feet to be 8″ each, and the cross-bar 36″ across, but I didn’t know how much that would leave for the vertical supports. I got all of the feet laid out and the cross-bars and was left with 3 sections of pipe 24″, 16″ and 48″ long. I divided these into six, 12″ pieces and two 8″ pieces, which would give me three hurdles approximately 14″ high and one hurdle 10″ high.

Preschool hurdlesHappy with the fact that I would be able to build all 4 hurdles with zero waste I set about making the cuts. You could do this with a hacksaw, but using the tubing cutter was MUCH easier, resulting in nice clean cuts, in a fraction of the time a saw would have required! Starting with the feet I attached two of the 8″ pieces into each of the tees, and then attached two elbows to each cross-bar. I was planning to cement these pieces together, but the fit was pretty tight without glue and I ended up just leaving them loose. I may go back and glue them later so that I don’t have to keep straightening out downed hurdles. Regardless of whether I glue these pieces or not I will leave the vertical pieces unglued so that I can make the hurdles taller as the boys grow. I may also get some PVC end caps for the feet so that the cut edge of pipe is not exposed.

Once they were all assembled, I tossed the 4 hurdles into the back lawn and let the kids at them. The laughing, running and jumping left them both breathless in 10 minutes and it was obvious the project was a success. It took about half an hour to finish, and cost $34 for all the items on the list. Expansion of the current set of hurdles will require only PVC pipe, and the sky’s the limit!

And no one was hurt at field day!

 

 

Categories: fitness, parenting Tags: , ,

Rock’n Wall

April 6th, 2012 No comments

“Take it to the wall!” That’s what we now tell our kids to do when they get frustrated, or whiny, or worked up. No matter the weather, they now have a place to go and work their minds and bodies, and experience accomplishment.

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The project started with a Christmas gift idea from Nana. “Should I get them a climbing wall set?” It seemed like a good idea, it wasn’t a toy, or something that made noise, or something unhealthy. And when they opened the gift the excitement was obvious. “Can we set it up now, Dad!?” I had to explain to them that we needed to build a special wall to climb on. The set included a book that gave great instructions about how to build a wall, with just one small problem: it didn’t have the words “DON’T PANIC” in large, friendly letters on the cover. I panicked.

Where are we going to put it? Is it going inside or outside? How big does it need to be? What if it’s too difficult for the kids?

These are just some of the many thoughts I had every time I thought about the box sitting in the basement. Luckily, plans were made for Nana and Grampy to visit at Easter, and Grampy agreed to help build the wall while he was here. The panicky feelings began to subside.

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With a trip to the hardware store we had everything we needed: studs, plywood, and lots and lots of screws (the climbing set included all of the mounting hardware). After some deliberation we decided on an 8′ x 8′ design in the basement, with a slight overhang to make it more challenging. Laying out the angles on a couple of studs and tacking them to the header and footer let us test fit the design in the space before filling in the wall with studs every 16″. If not for the fact that it was leaning outward, it would have looked like a good start on framing the basement!

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The plywood was a more overwhelming task. The book recommended laying each sheet on each other and drilling holes through 2 sheets at a time. There were no clear instructions on where to drill the holes though, apart from the advice to not drill them at the locations of the studs. A half-hour of discussion later and we had a plan for the locations of the holes, one that would keep the same 6″ spacing along the length of the wall. After drilling, cutting and hammering 84 T-nuts into the back of the plywood, we were ready to screw the sheets to the wall. As the kids anxiously waited, the process of attaching the 35 climbing holds to the wall slowly took place.

Immediately after finishing the kids scrambled up the wall and all fears of difficulty were washed away. They climbed up and down; they climbed sideways. After attaching a bell to the rafter they became even more intent on reaching the top and ringing the bell in victory. They climbed until their arms hurt, then they would rest and climb some more.

Suddenly, what was once just a basement is now an activity room that can offer year round exercise to everyone (even I can find challenging routes across the wall). As the kids develop, the large holds can be swapped out with small ones, making it an ever-adapting challenge. It provides them with an active option no matter what the weather, and shows them that we want physical activity to be a part of all of our lives on a daily basis.

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All Done!